THEY CALL ME ZARKO

When Liberty Burns

As broadcast on WLRN-Miami.

On December 17th, 1979… after failing to stop for a traffic light, Miami police officers gave chase to Arthur Lee McDuffie, a 33-year-old African American insurance agent and former Marine. When McDuffie surrendered, he was beaten until he lost consciousness.

That beating by four police officers resulted in his death.

After the officers were tried and acquitted on charges including manslaughter and evidence tampering, riots broke out in the black neighborhoods of Overtown and Liberty City on the night of May 17.

Those riots continued until May 20, resulting in 18 additional deaths.

While “When Liberty Burns” highlights the life and death of Arthur L. McDuffie, his story is simply a launching point for a far grander historical examination of the context in which the city of Miami developed during America’s Jim Crow era.

The film traces the dynamics of race relations in the city and uses this analysis as a microcosmic examination of what is happening across the nation… still… today.

By looking at the history of the friction between White and Black America in 1979 Miami through the eyes of those who were there, the viewer is provided with context toward a better understanding of today’s America, an America in which there continues to be an epidemic level of race violence.

Featured in the film are:

  • Frederica Watts McDuffie / Widow of the late Arthur Lee McDuffie
  • Forestine Reid / McDuffie Family Matriarch
  • Elder Shederika McDuffie Johnson / First born of Arthur Lee McDuffie
  • Marc McDuffie / Son of Arthur Lee McDuffie, a gospel music Minister.
  • Luis McDuffie / Older Brother Of Arthur L. McDuffie
  • Gwendolyn Anderson / Childhood friend of Arthur Lee McDuffie
  • Perman Anderson / Childhood friend of Arthur Lee McDuffie, retired City of Miami firefighter
  • Lonnie Lawrence / Retired Public Information Officer and Former Director of Miami-Dade County Corrections Department
  • Linda Saunders / Former Internal Affairs Investigator, Miami-Dade Police Department
  • Sam Stubbs / Former Motorcycle officer, City of Miami Police Force
  • Marshall Frank / Former Homicide  Investigator, Miami-Dade Police Department
  • Valeria Bland Thomas / Former Counsel for City of Miami-Dade Police Department
  • Floyd Jordan / Retired firefighter, City of Miami
  • Willie Logan / former Mayor of the City of Opa-Locka
  • Dr. N.D.B Connolly / author of “A World More Concrete: Real Estate and the Remaking of Jim Crow South Florida”
  • Dr. Marvin Dunn / Author of several books including “A History of Florida Through Black Eyes”.
  • Dr. Tameka Bradley Hobbs / author of “Democracy Abroad, Lynching at Home: Racial Violence in Florida”
  • WINNER: Knight Feature Film Award, Miami Film Festival (2020)
  • NOMINATED: Knight Documentary Achievement Award, Best Documentary, Miami Film Festival (2020)

Production Year: 2020 / 111 Minutes / Color / English / 16×9 HD / A film by Dudley Alexis

HOW TO ORDER:

Public Performance and Digital Site Licenses are available through Soundview Media Partners. To inquire or to place an order, write to info@soundviewmediapartners.com or simply choose from the options below:

License Options

For small group screening prices, please inquire.

In Home version is available on Amazon: https://amzn.to/3psvfa5

When Liberty Burns Trailer from Epyllion Studios on Vimeo.

From the Holocaust to Hollywood – The Robert Clary Story

I Danced for the Angel of Death – The Dr. Edith Eva Eger Story

Broadcast Nationally on Public Television (April 2021).

2021 Emmy Award Winner: Ron Small for Best Director Long Form Feature, 45th Suncoast Regional Emmy Awards.

New York Times best-selling author of The Choice: Embrace the Possible, Dr. Edith Eva Eger, tells her story of survival in this 2021 production from The Holocaust Education Film Foundation, (a 501c3).

At the age of sixteen, Edith Eger was sent to Auschwitz. Hours after her parents were killed, Nazi officer Dr. Josef Mengele (The Angel of Death), forced her to dance for his amusement. This dance saved her life.

The Foundation’s newest production features 93-year-old Dr. Edith Eva Eger, who is possibly the most famous living Holocaust Survivor due in large part to her bestselling books, appearances on talk shows, and her still thriving psychology practice, specializing in Trauma and PTSD.

Born in 1927 in Kosice, Slovakia, where she lived with her parents and two older sisters, Magda and Klara, Edith Eger lived a typical Jewish life. The family eventually moved to Budapest, Hungary where in 1944 Nazis put them on a cattle car to Auschwitz as part of the Final Solution. Klara, a violin prodigy who “didn’t look Jewish” was hidden by her music professor and continued to perform during the war.

Upon arrival at Auschwitz, Edie’s parents were immediately murdered, and she spent her entire incarceration with her older sister Magda. Most chillingly, Edie had at least two interactions with “the Angel of Death” Dr. Josef Mengele. First when he tore her away from her mother with the promise that “your mother is going to take a shower and you’ll see her soon.” The second when he discovered she was a ballerina and gymnast and demanded she dance for him. The bread she received for dancing was shared with fellow prisoners who remembered this act of kindness and saved her life later in her story.

A few months after Auschwitz, Edith was placed in full prisoner garb on top of a munitions train as a human shield to keep the British from bombing (it didn’t work) and after a brief stint at Mauthausen was placed on a forced death march to Gunskirchen Lager where cannibalism had just broken out.

The full breadth of this horror is described in vivid detail through the eyes of Alan Moskin, a 95-year-old Patton’s Army soldier who liberated Gunskirchen Lager. His interview is nothing short of breathtaking and you will hang on every word. Incredibly, there were 44,000 concentration camps and other Nazi internment sites, and we found a living liberator who remembers every moment of his experience in that self-described “hell hole.” He did not speak of this horror for 50 years, but we have him now preserved for history.

After the war, Edith’s nightmare did not yet end. From the Communist overthrow of Hungary, to her husband’s imprisonment and her smuggling him out, to their arrival penniless in the USA, you will marvel at how this determined and dynamic woman refused to be a victim and never gave up, becoming a published bestselling author and internationally acclaimed Psychologist.

Edith weaves her remarkable personal journey with the moving stories of those she has helped heal. She explores how we can be imprisoned in our own minds and shows us how to find the key to freedom. Her book, The Choice, is a life-changer that provides hope and comfort to generations of readers.

Oprah Winfrey said “I’ll be forever changed by Dr. Eger’s story.”

Desmond Tutu, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate wrote “Dr. Eger’s life reveals our capacity to transcend even the greatest of horrors and to use that suffering for the benefit of others. She has found true freedom and forgiveness and shows us how we can as well.”

In “I Danced for the Angel of Death”, Dr. Edith Eva Eger tells her own story.

Documentary / 2021 / 57 minutes / Color / English / A film by Ron Small

About the Foundation:

The Holocaust Education Film Foundation was formed to preserve first-person narratives of Holocaust Survivors through documentaries.

Beginning with “To Auschwitz and Back – The Joe Engel Story,” which was followed by “Surviving Birkenau – The Dr. Susan Spatz Story” and “From the Holocaust to Hollywood – The Robert Clary Story”, the Foundation’s work has provided an outlet to preserve history. The hope is that future generations may learn from these stories and heed the warning of those who experienced the worst of humanity; attempting to keep history from repeating itself.

HOW TO ORDER:

Public Performance and Digital Site Licenses are available through Soundview Media Partners. To inquire or to place an order, write to info@soundviewmediapartners.com or simply choose from the options below:

License Options

For group screening prices, please inquire.

In-home/personal use copies are available on Amazon beginning November 9, 2021: https://amzn.to/3eMhvBj

Bondage

American Heretics: The Politics of the Gospel

We Are Not Princesses

The Syrian refugee crisis is not the fallout of the inevitable violence of war, but an intended outcome of a deliberate strategy by the Assad regime to shift responsibility for his citizens to the rest of the world. Those who have fled the violence are not opportunists seeking handouts and social services in the West, but part of a massive humanitarian crisis that is the tool of a political agenda.

In “We Are Not Princesses”, Antigone, the ancient Greek heroine, ignites the spirits of 4 Syrian women living as refugees in Beirut.

In this world-wide, critically acclaimed feature documentary, Feminine wisdom, passed through the ages, connects the inner lives of a group of women providing them with a sense of belonging.  Through intimate verite footage, the film illustrates that which is invisible to the eye: The thoughts, memories and dreams of these mothers, sisters and wives as they grapple daily with past traumas and future uncertainty.

The women featured in “We Are Not Princesses” are living as refugees in Beirut. Four women are highlighted in the film, but others wanted to tell their stories. Their families would not allow them. Creative production animation was used to permit the denied to participate without revealing their identities.

The four featured women are:

Fedwa, 60, is the mother-figure of the group. Despite having lost two sons in two years, she remains determined to hold her family together. Paradoxically, she identifies with Sophocles’ flawed leader, Creon, because of his obstinacy and desire to keep order at all costs.

Heba, 27, Fedwa’s daughter, has, like Antigone, gone through the pain of losing both of her brothers, one of whom she never had the chance to bury as he was shot by a sniper coming out of a Damascus mosque.

Isra’a, 22, believes she is Antigone through and through. She is vocal about how the war has offered an opportunity to liberate Syrian women. She sings a rap of her story of fleeing Yarmouk camp, along with thousands of others, while wearing 4-inch high heels.  Isra’a is self-confident and the other women admire her for it.

Mona, 30, when her son was dying was unable to get him to the hospital in time because of shelling. Now in Beirut, Mona is racked with guilt. Mona is the narrator leading the viewer through the film with her poetic reflections on life in the camps and on Antigone.  Her reflections speak to the universal truths of the film, such as choice and how to regain a sense of self when all that you’ve known has been ripped away.

The film brings forth a unique structure. Built around the development of a theater workshop and the rehearsals for the performance, the structural foundation of the film, “We Are Not Princesses” is not an observational documentary about the putting on of a play. Instead, the film explores how these newfound tools of expression taught in the workshop play out in the lives of the women outside of the rehearsal  and performance space.

The personal experiences and stories of the actresses, as well as their reaction to the play itself, are woven into the structure of the overall experience. Following the four women, we explore the theater space, the domestic space, and the public space of Beirut through an intimate narrative guided by the women’s voices.

ABOUT THE FILMMAKERS

Bridgette Auger (Co-Director/DP/Producer): Bridgette is an artist and filmmaker strongly committed to using art for social change. She has lived and worked in the Middle East for over 12 years, covering the Arab Spring in Egypt and Libya as well as the refugee crisis as a result of the war in Syria. Bridgette sought out intimate stories to raise complex questions about sensitive issues. Her credits include The Guardian, New York Times, Die Zeit and the short film “This Is Not Me هاد مو أنا: Enduring Syria’s War”. Bridgette holds a degree in Photography and Imaging from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts, and a Masters degree in Social documentation from the University of California, Santa Cruz.

Itab Azzam (Co-Director/DP): Itab is a London-based Syrian filmmaker. She won a BAFTA in 2017 for her work producing the BBC Two series Exodus: Our Journey to Europe, and is also a winner of a British Broadcast award and a Liberty Human Rights award. Itab has extensive television experience including the BBC’s Syrian School; the series East West; and Bizarre Foods: Syria for the Travel Channel. She co-founded Sabbara, a Syrian social enterprise empowering women through economic employment and psychological support, and also co-founded the Open Art Foundation, an arts charity that works with marginalised communities around the world.

2018 / 74 Minutes / Color / 16×9 / Arabic with English Sub-titles / A film by Bridgette Auger and Itab Azzam

HOW TO ORDER:

Public Performance and Digital Site Licenses are available through Soundview Media Partners. To inquire or to place an order, write to info@soundviewmediapartners.com or simply choose from the options below:

License Options

For group screening prices, please inquire.

In-home/personal use copies are available on Amazon: https://amzn.to/3i0tbPD

WATCH THE TRAILER

WANP_Trailer from sara maamouri on Vimeo.

WHAT WE DON’T SAY

Escape from Room 18

Hope Village