Bondage

American Heretics: The Politics of the Gospel

At what other point in our history has the line between church and state become so tangled and polarizing?

“This documentary has the potential to move hearts and minds”– Kimber Myers, Los Angeles Times.

“Eye-opening” – Ben Kenigsberg, The New York Times 

“…it speaks to what it means to find common ground,
to live with our differences.”-
Tyler Hammel, The Daily Progress

Every story has a birthplace, a core, a microcosm from which when expanded upon takes on a larger than life arc. In “American Heretics”, a group of deeply faithful Christians in Oklahoma are challenging firmly rooted fundamentalist Christian doctrine. Labeled as “heretics” for their beliefs and seemingly defiant interpretations of the Gospels, they are open minded to the Bible as a living document and have made incredible progress.

American Heretics challenges what we think we know about the Christian heartland by offering a rare personal glimpse into the contentious and often misunderstood history of religion, race, and politics in America, all seen through the eyes of a courageous group of Oklahomans working to bridge the divide within their community.

“…it speaks to what it means to find common ground, to live with our differences.” – Tyler Hammel, The Daily Progress

Directed and Produced by Emmy Award-Winning Filmmakers Jeanine Isabel Butler and Catherine Lynn Butler, American Heretics touches upon major themes in America and the definition of our nation including, but not limited to:

  • Immigration
  • Gay Rights / Gay Marriage
  • Race
  • Political Activism
  • Black History
  • Gender Bias
  • Societal Oppression
  • Religious History
  • Sanctuary Cities
  • Heresy

Told with both personally emotional stories and arresting expert narration weaved throughout cinematic footage, photographs and illustrations that maintain a progressive pace, American Heretics is a politically charged tale of America that brings hotly debated subjects to the forefront of consciousness.

Consider this…

Christianity is the most adhered to religion in the United States with over 70% of polled American adults identifying themselves as Christian in 2019. With an LGBTQ theme as a core subject in American Heretics, the subject itself is a hot button throughout the Christian community. According to the most recent Pew Research Center study of acceptance rates of homosexuality in America (2020), while 70% of Catholics believe it should be accepted, only 38% of Evangelists believe so. This divided acceptance is possibly the largest subject of division within the Christian community with
gay marriage at the center of it.

Of the top 5 issues being faced in America (according to Heritage.org) , 4 are addressed head on in American Heretics:
 
Conservatism vs. Progressivism
Health Care
Immigration
Religious Freedom
Marriage √

Among those featured in American Heretics are Dr. Reverend Robin Meyers, Reverend Lori Walke, Dr. Bernard Brandon Scott, Reverend Bishop Carlton Pearson, Dr. Robert Jones, Nehemiah D. Frank, Reverend Marlin Lavanhar, Oklahoma State Representative Collin R. Walke (D-87) and more.

About the filmmakers:

JEANINE ISABEL BUTLER (Producer, Writer and Director):
Jeanine is an award-winning director, producer and writer. Specializing in documentaries and non- fiction entertainment, her work has been broadcast across multiple platforms, screened at film festivals worldwide and garnered numerous awards, including 3 National Emmy nominations for Documenting the Face of America (PBS), The Science of HIV/AIDS (The Discovery Channel), and Africa (BBC/Discovery Channel). Butler has produced, written and directed longform documentaries for Explorer, the premier documentary series for National Geographic and crafted strategic storytelling for nonprofits and international NGOs.

CATHERINE LYNN BUTLER (Producer and Co-Writer): Catherine Lynn Butler is an Emmy award-winning documentary writer/producer with global experience developing and delivering impactful long and short form documentaries for television, museums, educational nonprofits and NGOs. Emmy Award winning docs include Journey of the Universe (PBS); The Women of Tibet (PBS); and a National Emmy nomination for Documenting the Face of America (PBS). She also produced the critically acclaimed feature-length investigative documentary The Future of Food, which enjoyed widespread theatrical and digital distribution.

2019 / Documentary / 85 Minutes / Color / 16×9 / English Language / A film by Jeanine Isabel Butler and Catherine Lynn Butler.

HOW TO ORDER:

Public Performance and Digital Site Licenses are available through Soundview Media Partners. To inquire or to place an order, write to info@soundviewmediapartners.com or simply choose from the options below:

License Options

For group screening prices, please inquire.

Watch the trailer

We Are Not Princesses

Coming to DVD and digital 12/15/20…

The Syrian refugee crisis is not the fallout of the inevitable violence of war, but an intended outcome of a deliberate strategy by the Assad regime to shift responsibility for his citizens to the rest of the world. Those who have fled the violence are not opportunists seeking handouts and social services in the West, but part of a massive humanitarian crisis that is the tool of a political agenda.

In “We Are Not Princesses”, Antigone, the ancient Greek heroine, ignites the spirits of 4 Syrian women living as refugees in Beirut.

In this world-wide, critically acclaimed feature documentary, Feminine wisdom, passed through the ages, connects the inner lives of a group of women providing them with a sense of belonging.  Through intimate verite footage, the film illustrates that which is invisible to the eye: The thoughts, memories and dreams of these mothers, sisters and wives as they grapple daily with past traumas and future uncertainty.

The women featured in “We Are Not Princesses” are living as refugees in Beirut. Four women are highlighted in the film, but others wanted to tell their stories. Their families would not allow them. Creative production animation was used to permit the denied to participate without revealing their identities.

The four featured women are:

Fedwa, 60, is the mother-figure of the group. Despite having lost two sons in two years, she remains determined to hold her family together. Paradoxically, she identifies with Sophocles’ flawed leader, Creon, because of his obstinacy and desire to keep order at all costs.

Heba, 27, Fedwa’s daughter, has, like Antigone, gone through the pain of losing both of her brothers, one of whom she never had the chance to bury as he was shot by a sniper coming out of a Damascus mosque.

Isra’a, 22, believes she is Antigone through and through. She is vocal about how the war has offered an opportunity to liberate Syrian women. She sings a rap of her story of fleeing Yarmouk camp, along with thousands of others, while wearing 4-inch high heels.  Isra’a is self-confident and the other women admire her for it.

Mona, 30, when her son was dying was unable to get him to the hospital in time because of shelling. Now in Beirut, Mona is racked with guilt. Mona is the narrator leading the viewer through the film with her poetic reflections on life in the camps and on Antigone.  Her reflections speak to the universal truths of the film, such as choice and how to regain a sense of self when all that you’ve known has been ripped away.

The film brings forth a unique structure. Built around the development of a theater workshop and the rehearsals for the performance, the structural foundation of the film, “We Are Not Princesses” is not an observational documentary about the putting on of a play. Instead, the film explores how these newfound tools of expression taught in the workshop play out in the lives of the women outside of the rehearsal  and performance space.

The personal experiences and stories of the actresses, as well as their reaction to the play itself, are woven into the structure of the overall experience. Following the four women, we explore the theater space, the domestic space, and the public space of Beirut through an intimate narrative guided by the women’s voices.

ABOUT THE FILMMAKERS

Bridgette Auger (Co-Director/DP/Producer): Bridgette is an artist and filmmaker strongly committed to using art for social change. She has lived and worked in the Middle East for over 12 years, covering the Arab Spring in Egypt and Libya as well as the refugee crisis as a result of the war in Syria. Bridgette sought out intimate stories to raise complex questions about sensitive issues. Her credits include The Guardian, New York Times, Die Zeit and the short film “This Is Not Me هاد مو أنا: Enduring Syria’s War”. Bridgette holds a degree in Photography and Imaging from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts, and a Masters degree in Social documentation from the University of California, Santa Cruz.

Itab Azzam (Co-Director/DP): Itab is a London-based Syrian filmmaker. She won a BAFTA in 2017 for her work producing the BBC Two series Exodus: Our Journey to Europe, and is also a winner of a British Broadcast award and a Liberty Human Rights award. Itab has extensive television experience including the BBC’s Syrian School; the series East West; and Bizarre Foods: Syria for the Travel Channel. She co-founded Sabbara, a Syrian social enterprise empowering women through economic employment and psychological support, and also co-founded the Open Art Foundation, an arts charity that works with marginalised communities around the world.

2018 / 74 Minutes / Color / 16×9 / Arabic with English Sub-titles / A film by Bridgette Auger and Itab Azzam

WATCH THE TRAILER

WANP_Trailer from sara maamouri on Vimeo.

In home/personal use copies of the DVD available on Amazon https://amzn.to/3i0tbPD

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