Secrets (Sodot Ha), The

El Bumbun

Fanchon The Cricket

Murderous Trance

Untold Story, The

If good horror reflects the deepest fears and mores of a society, then Hong Kong must have been terrified of being eaten in the 1990s.

In 1993, John Woo’s Killer/Hard Boiled stars, Danny Lee and Anthony Wong teamed up with Director Herman Yau (Shock Wave) to produce The Untold Story, one of the most notorious Cat III* films to emanate out of Hong Kong.

The story-line is loosely based on the story of The Eight Immortals Restaurant: In 1978 Hong Kong, a grisly murder takes place. Eight years later, on a Macao beach, kids discover the severed hands of a fresh victim. A squadron of coarse, happy-go-lucky cops investigate, and suspicion falls on Wong Chi Hang, the new owner of Eight Immortals Restaurant, which serves delicious pork bun.

The hands belong to the missing mother of the restaurant’s former owner; he and his family have disappeared and staff at the restaurant continue to go missing. Wong can’t produce a signed bill of sale: but there’s no evidence against him. The police arrest Wong and try to torture him into a confession. Can they make him talk? And what was in those pork buns?

Written by and starring Danny Lee (John Woo’s The Killer, City on Fire) and Anthony Wong (The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor, John Woo’s Hard Boiled). Anthony Wong won The Hong Kong Best Actor Award for this role in The Untold Story.

The DVD version of the film boasts some wonderful extras. Included are:

  • Category III: The Untold Story of Hong Kong Exploitation Cinema directed by Calum Waddell
  • An interview by Rick Baker
  • Commentary by Herman Yau
  • Commentary with Anthony Wong

Comedic, intense and downright unforgivable, The Untold Story is truly a masterpiece of horror cinema that once seen, can never be forgotten.

  • *Category 3 films are defined by The Hong Kong Motion Picture Rating System as: No persons younger than 18 years of age are permitted to rent, purchase, or watch this film in the cinema. Category 3 films are the equivalent of the MPAA’s NC-17.

“Of the many, many Cat III works released, probably the most infamous is Herman Yau’s “The Untold Story” from 1993. Despite its restrictive rating, it went on to be a hit at the box office and earned lead actor Anthony Wong a Best Actor nomination and his first win at the Hong Kong Film Awards, before going on its way to become a notorious cult classic.” – Asian Movie Pulse

1993 / Cult Horror / 96 minutes / Mandarin w/English subtitles / A film by Herman Yau

HOW TO ORDER:

Public Performance and Digital Site Licenses are available through Soundview Media Partners. To inquire or to place an order, write to info@soundviewmediapartners.com or simply choose from the options below:

License Options

For group screening prices, please inquire.

In-home/personal use copies are available on Amazon: https://amzn.to/3kd569v

Watch the trailer

When the Wind Blows

Djon Africa

Navajo

A Navajo boy stoically endures hardship, hunger and the death of his family.

Nominated for two Academy Awards in 1952, NAVAJO follows a young “Indian” boy named Son of the Hunter (played by Frances Kee Teller) in his search for what “home” means to him following the death of his parents. After being shuffled into an oppressive Indian boarding school designed to assimilate him into US culture, he shakes himself free and runs into the cavernous homeland of his ancestors with representatives of his school in hot pursuit.

“Unusual, truly picturesque and convincing” – New York Times

Filmed almost entirely on reservation land (specifically in majestic Canyon de Chelly) with tenuous permission from what was then called the United States Indian Service (the agency repeatedly tried to ban production of the film), it’s equal parts character-driven plot for the main character and advertisement for the supposedly untouched natural beauty of the West.

“Memorable – stirringly beautiful”Christian Science Monitor

The film touches on a number of different issues pertinent to the experience of “Indians,” as they were called in the film (and as some refer to themselves, reclaiming the term). The 72 minute movie examines the dispossession of Native American peoples, the Indian boarding schools set up by the 1887 Dawes Act to “kill the Indian to save the man,” and environmentalism, all through Indigenous eyes. Our lens into this world is a child, meaning our dives into each of those topics never get too deep, but each leaves us with more to think about and look into in future investigations.

While the film may well show its age, it is still important to our understanding of how film (especially lower-budget indie films) can change minds and hearts and push for systemic change as well. It’s very much a piece of its time.

The cast features:

  • Francis Kee Teller
  • John Mitchell
  • Mrs. Kee Teller
  • Sammy Ogg
  • William Draper
  • Hall Bartlett

The DVD version features a wonderful selection of bonus materials including:

  • Commentary by Francis Kee Teller
  • ‘Canyon de Chelly’ Photo-essay by Deborah Lem, Diné
  • ‘The Canyon Matters” by Genny Yazzie, Diné
  • 1952 National Publicity Tour with Mr. Teller (age 8)
  • ‘Our Navajo Neighbors’ 1952 documentary
  • 2K scan from the Academy Film Archive preservation negative

1952 / 72 minutes / Docudrama / Black & White / English / A film by Norman Foster

HOW TO ORDER:

Public Performance and Digital Site Licenses are available through Soundview Media Partners. To inquire or to place an order, write to info@soundviewmediapartners.com or simply choose from the options below:

License Options

For group screening prices, please inquire.

In-home/personal use copies are available on Amazon: https://amzn.to/3l4fXnF

Watch the trailer

Bondage

Freedom Road